We encourage all businesses listed on Buy Something Tasmanian to follow the latest COVID-19 advice and restrictions.
Check here for up-to-date information on COVID-19 in Tasmania.

Sign In

News

The Ultimate Tassie Spring List

The Ultimate Tassie Spring List

Glorious spring is in the air and our winter hibernation is pretty much done and dusted (we reserve the right to come back to it at any time). Spring is a special time of year, because there are certain special things you can only enjoy in spring!

To help you make the most of this season, we’ve put together our top ideas below, which you can enjoy in any corner of the state, you just need to get up and go.

While you’re at it, grab a cup of tea or coffee and settle in, because it’s not called “The Ultimate Tassie Spring List” for no reason.

Meet some babies (of the fluffy variety)

If you’re looking for things to do with kids (or without them, we don’t judge), head out to look at some of the baby wildlife around the state.

South

North

  • Apricus Launceston and Old Macs Caravan and Motorhome Farm Stay offers the opportunity to take a nature walk, feed the farm animals, grab a bite at the cafe, take in the hillside scenery, and be sure to pack the tent or bring the van as you can even stay a night or two.   
  • A world heritage listed farm village, Brickendon, is a wonderful place for the whole family to explore.  Rich in history discover the story of the Archer family and get up close and personal with the friendly sheep, horses, goats, chickens and even a pig named Aggie!
  • Yimarra Farm – baby alpacas – need we say more! Cute, cuddly and oh so fun to feed.  Visit to view the animals in action, the Tasmanian wares at the gift shop, and the edible flowers created from the garden surrounding the property. 

Northwest

  • Go for the day or stay for the night atWings Wildlife Park, a family owned multi award winning wildlife park. You’ll get the chance to get up close and personal with over 150 different species!
  • Devils at Cradle is a unique Tasmanian conservation sanctuary located at the entrance to the spectacular Cradle Mountain National Park. Fun fact: there’s free entry for kids on selected tours until December 1st when booked directly.

East Coast

Your cup runneth over!

Spring is the time we get a sneak peak at the harvest and vintage to come with wine, cider, beer and produce galore. Buds on trees, the smell of hops in the air (in the Derwent Valley at least!). We’re blessed with a bounty of markets and farm gates statewide, so wherever you find yourself on the weekend, be sure to stop in, support our local growers and pick up something to tantilize the taste buds.

South

  • Visit the Salamanca Market on Saturday or the Farm Gate Market on Sunday!
  • Head to Richmond and the Coal River Valley to visit one of the 33 wineries on offer in this beautiful region
  • Huon Valley – it’s known as the apple isle for a reason. Head down and try out one of the many ciders! Apple, blueberry, apricot, cherry, pear, quince … you’ll be spoilt for choice.
  • If you head out to the Derwent Valley, stop in at the Agrarian Kitchen or one of the beautiful providores on offer.

North

  • Harvest Community Farmer’s Market – Indulge in the freshest produce of the season, chat to the friendly producers and grab a coffee hit to go.
  • Farm Gate Festival.  Celebrating it’s 4th year, producers and farmers open up their farm gates and welcome you to their properties in the Tamar Valley.  Taste, go behind the scenes and hear first hand from the growers themselves how they’ve had a part to play in the Tasmanian food story. 
  • Open a conversation – take a drive and call in to one of the many vineyards that form the Tamar Valley Wine Route.  While you’re at it, check out the new cellar door at Stoney Rise for a tasting and some delectable share plates.

East

North West

  • Let your tastebuds follow the Cradle to Coast Tasting Trail and discover some of the finest produce the North West has to offer. From award winning produce, to sweet treats, farm stalls, cellar doors and more, you’ll uncover the delights of the tasting trail.

Forage and feast with a picnic

Pack a picnic, throw a rug in the boot and head to one of these spectacular locations to enjoy the springtime weather.

South

  • Is there any better place for a picnic than in the Huon Valley? Go past road ride stalls, pick up some local faire and pick your perfect spot to let time slip away and enjoy the time with family and good food.
  • If you’re heading out to the Tasman peninsula, you’ll be spoilt for choice. There are too many beaches, clifftops and picnic spots to choose from, but it’s worth a trip just to have a lunch time view to remember. To start your trip, head to Cubed Espresso for the best view on the peninsula.
  • Bruny Island is full of picnic stop opportunities and it’s impossible to narrow it down to one, so we recommend you forage and feast and pick a spot that takes your fancy! Down south you can enjoy the bruny lighthouse, or the neck.
  • Derwent Valley, head to Mount Field National Park and enjoy a picnic after (or before, we’re not judging) going to explore three beautiful waterfalls (Russell Falls, Horseshoe Falls and Lady Baron Falls).

North

  • Watch the boats roll in by the seaside at Beauty Point or beneath the Low Head lighthouse.
  • For spectacular scenery and peaceful surroundings, gather lakeside at Huntsman’s Lake Picnic Area.  A great place to stop to or from one of the nearby short walks.
  • Cataract Gorge Reserve – consider the Fairy Dell for private gathering, or First Basin for a picnic.
  • Sit under the willows and cherry blossom trees in Deloraine on the banks of the river. You might even spot a platypus.

East Coast

  • The stunning coastline of the East Coast stretches over 220km and boasts a plethora of picnic spots. Take your pick from any of our beaches
  • Take a trip over to Maria Island National Park and choose anywhere on the island to picnic with our wombat friends
  • Nestled on a secluded beach at Little Swanport, the old Lisdillon Saltworks marks a significant part of Tasmania’s industrial heritage
  • Orford – right beside the water overlooking Maria Island National Park
  • Freycinet Peninsula and Coles Bay – including Friendly Beaches, Honeymoon Bay
  • Douglas Apsley National Park is a place of rugged river gorges, waterfalls, tall stands of eucalypts, tranquil pools and pockets of rainforest. Pull up and picnic around the clear blue waters of the waterhole.
  • The Bay of Fires is a slice of coastal heaven – Binalong Bay, Cosy Corner, Jeanneret Beach, Swimcart Beach are just to name a few
  • Moving further Seymour, Falmouth, Scamander, Beaumaris, Georges Bay, St Helens
  • Collect shells on Kelvedon Beach – the cobbled rock patches and sands are littered with beautiful shells to collect. While you are there, be sure to check out the old weathered boatshed which stands solitary on this exposed strip of beach.
  • Picnic amongst the vines and enjoy some East Coast wines
  • Head away from the coast into the hinterland – stop at St Marys, Fingal, Pyengana

North West

  • Immerse yourself in the history and admire the sculpture at Bells Parade Reserve located in Latrobe.
  • Picnic and platypus spotting? Yes Please! Fernglade Reserve is known as one of the best places to spot one of these cute creatures in the wild. For your best chance of spotting a platypus, we recommend going in the morning or evening.

The gardens are bloomin’ beautiful!

Spring and gardens go hand in hand. The flowers blooming, the bees buzzing and the colours popping. It’s a great time to visit a garden with the family. Some have nominal entry fees and others are free. Check out some ideas below.

South

  • Royal Tasmanian Botanical Gardens is home to thousands of species of native and exotic plants. Explore the beautifully landscaped gardens, admire the stunning spring blooms, look for boisterous ducklings lily-pad hopping in the pond, have a picnic, or treat yourself to lunch at the restaurant. The Japanese gardens are popping with Cherry Blossom colour, while the conservatory is full of orchids and flowers (tulips included) pave the way inside.
  • Visit the historic Cascade Brewery (est. 1824) and explore three acres of heritage gardens (and of course taste the beer and cider).
  • The Inverawe Native Gardens at Margate are a delight (keep an eye out for birdlife and quirky sculptures).
  • Birchs Bay Art Farm has views, art, is dog friendly and is a beautiful drive down the channel.

North

  • Launceston’s City Park, located in the heart of the CBD is home  to a conservatory, sprawling gardens, and the resident Japanese Macaques monkeys.
  • Heritage estates and gardens go hand in hand – head to Woolmer’s Estate for a self-guided tour of the grounds, gardens and outbuildings.  In November you will likely see the National Rose Garden come in to bloom. 
  • Entally House encompasses grand, parlike surroundings with plenty of history to ponder as you wander.  Franklin and Clarendon House are other prestigious properties with signature gardens to match.

Northwest

  • Walk in hectares of tulips that flower from September to October each year, Table Cape Tulip Farm.
  • Located 8km south of Burnie, Emu Valley Rhododendron Garden covers 11 hectares and has over 22,000 plants already planted.
  • Open daily till sunset, Kaydale Lodge Gardens is an amazing two-hectare garden. Wander through the garden and then enjoy morning/afternoon teas and light lunches in their tea room.

East Coast

  • Take a walk through the Tasmanian Bushland Gardens – This beautiful regional botanic garden is 22 hectares comprising bushland with walking tracks and formal gardens to showcase the local native plants
  • Famous for its crystal-clear waters, white sandy beaches and orange lichen-covered granite boulders, stop by The Gardens at the Bay of Fires – here’s a tip, it’s not your typical garden…

Wildflowers are out

South

North

East Coast

  • Revel in the beauty of Tasmania’s native flora at the Tasmanian Bushland Garden – one of the very few public gardens in Tasmania devoted entirely to Tasmanian native plants.

Watch the whale migration

The milder spring weather means it’s time for the whales to head home from their winter migration. Some are proudly making the journey south with calves! If you’re keen to do some whale watching, there are some good land-based lookout points along the East Coast.

South

  • Try Cockle Creek, at the end of Australia’s southernmost road (you are at least guaranteed to see the big bronze whale sculpture). You will probably have more luck on the water. Pennicott Wilderness Journeys run regular eco-tours, including Tasman Island Cruises and Bruny Island Cruises. Whales aren’t guaranteed, but you might just get lucky. Playful dolphins are very likely on the cards (maybe with babies!), as they love playing chasings with the boat.       If hiking is more your style, head to one of the many cliffs with uninterrupted views east overlooking the ocean on the Tasman Peninsula or Bruny Island.

North

East Coast

  • The waters surrounding the East Coast are home to diverse and remarkable wildlife. You can watch whales anywhere along the East Coast beaches – with calm waters, its a main migration for whales
  • Keep your eye out for pods of dolphins surfing the bow wave and Australian fur seals hauling out along the coast.
  • Meet Tasmania’s only Green Anaconda and other reptiles at Serpentarium Wildlife Park Tasmania
  • Spot diverse birdlife including albatross, shearwaters, diving gannets, little penguins and cormorants.
  • If whale watching aboard a vessel is more your style, try Bay of Fires Eco Tours and further south, Bicheno’s Glass Bottom Boat, Wineglass Bay Tours or East Coast Cruises.

Photo credit Luke Tscharke

Related Posts